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Posts Tagged ‘pre-vocational training’

I’ve got good news and bad news.   To decide which to write about first, I’ll flip a moneycoin piece.  Heads = good news first, tails = bad news first.

Bad news it is.

Jonah’s recent behavioral team review from Anderson tells the story well enough:


9/11/2018 
Reason for Appointment: BTR (Behavioral Team Review)
Chief Complaint: Aggression, Non-Compliance

There has been a significant increase in the intensity of Jonah’s aggression.  Recently dislocated teacher’s arm during restrictive management. He has also bitten people. He seems more on edge.  Episodes of aggression are not frequent but when he is aggressive it has been extremely intense.

Currently the team is trying to get approval for 4-person supine restrictive control.

Will increase clozapine dose by 25 mg/day.


As far as I know, Jonah’s teacher is still out on medical leave.  I hate that it happened and I hate that it was Jonah who hurt her.  I emailed her and sent an “I’m sorry” card;  Andy and I are worried about her and upset in a sickened kind of way, having gotten so used to the mostly smooth ride of spring and early summer.

A 4-person takedown is a big takedown.  If you’ve been reading my blog you might remember me talking about 2-person takedowns.  Somewhere in there they increased it to 3, and now 4.  The drug increase has made him sleepy;  it’s strong medication, the clozapine (or Clozaril, its brand name) and has a sedative effect.  It’s also the only thing that’s worked, really, at all.

And so this wet, hot summer has been peppered with these spikes in Jonah’s aggression.  One time it was just Jonah and Andy, in Andy’s apartment, and it got pretty hairy.  I remember speaking to Andy on the phone the night after it happened.  “I’ve still got him,” he told me.  I knew what he meant — he still has the edge on Jonah, strength wise, if only by a hair.  Andy does not have 3 other people to get both Jonah and he through the incidents safely, as they’ve deemed appropriate and necessary on the school campus.  So a cabinet in Andy’s apartment was destroyed, and both he and Jonah got more than a little scratched and bruised.  There were also a few hair-pulling incidents with varying levels of hurt and pain – although Officer Scattergood was our last run-in with the five oh.

There is good news, though.

Between incidents of extreme aggression, Jonah’s progress report (from 4/1-6/30/18) tells us “Jonah shows continued improvement in Transition Development programming, participating in daily living and pre-vocational skill activities as well as the on-campus work program and garden.  He’s learning to clean surfaces, wash dishes, sorting/folding/stacking laundry, making the bed, using the washer and dryer, loading & unloading the dishwasher, and setting the table — but he needs visual, verbal, and sometimes gestural prompting for these things.”

“He also works on meal prepping and clean up, including cutting, measuring ingredients, and using kitchen appliances. Jonah does especially well at the task of passing out plates, cups, and utensils to classmates.”

I even have photographic evidence of his cake-making skills, kindly provided to me by one of his residence caregivers, Tonya, just last week.

I don’t know if I’d believe these things if I didn’t have the pictures.  He’s much more independent and capable at Anderson than he is with us…partly, I think, because more is demanded and expected of him.

“He has been doing well with engaging more during group OT (occupational therapy).  He has been much more open to trying all the meals that he helps make!”

Wonders never cease.

 

 

 

 

 

“Jonah also completed pre-vocational tasks that developed his ability to sort, package, sequence, match, and assemble.  He can almost independently retrieve a task, perform that task and return the task.  However, Jonah needs encouragement to complete the task in a timely manner.  He can stay focused through the task and when finished he is able to put the task back with verbal prompting.  Jonah enjoys the color sorting.  This quarter there were new Vocation Specific tasks that included filling envelopes, folding paper, and labeling mail.  Jonah did well with these new tasks.”

“Jonah participates in several on-campus jobs including working in the garden and janitorial/recycling tasks.  While Jonah needs support learning new skills in the garden, he needs minimal assistance in completing his janitorial tasks.  During garden Jonah completes tasks such as watering plants, digging soil, weeding, and planting seeds.  Jonah enjoys watering the plants and sometimes himself and staff too!  Jonah continues to make deliveries around the school with the daily newspaper; he is doing very well.  He can almost complete this task independently.  Jonah continues to help assemble, package, and count items for the med-kits for surrounding classrooms around the school.  He continues to do well with these tasks.”

“Overall, Jonah has been an active participant in all areas of the Transition Program.  We will continue to work on accomplishing tasks more independently.”

This written by his teacher, about 6 weeks before he injured her.

Here he is in the pool with her, earlier in the summer.  She’s young, vibrant, and happy – full of energy and empathy.  She has often told us how much she enjoys having Jonah in the classroom.  I wonder how she feels about him now.  I wonder how she feels now about teaching these kids who attack and stim and struggle.

I hope she knows how important she is and how much we appreciate her.  No matter how many times we thank her and Jonah’s other teachers and residence caregivers, it will never be enough.

There is a lot more to say – more news of a different sort – but that’s a different entry.  Let me get this one out there first.

We must free ourselves of the hope that the sea will ever rest. We must learn to sail in high winds.  ~ Aristotle Onassis

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This post is in response to a comment I received on yesterday’s post, and in response to all the silent lurkers asking the same question:

If Jonah is so much better, why not bring him home?

First of all, Jonah does not live in an institution.  He lives in a house with 7 other kids and round the clock caregivers who love him.  He has a regular schedule & routine.  He goes to school on campus with wonderful teachers who nurture and educate him in a way that no one else could.  These people live and breathe autism.  Boo would never, ever have come as far as he has without being at the Anderson Center for Autism for the past three years.

Anderson also has pre-vocational and independence training, with mock apartments and mock work situations depending on each child’s ability.  The children learn to make beds, do laundry, help cook, etc.   The caregivers  take Jonah out in the community and teach him how to behave appropriately in the grocery store, at the movies, bowling, etc.  They have a huge pool on campus and Boo loves to swim.

Jonah is not “fixed.”  They have not cured him of autism.  I called it a “mini” major milestone for a damn good reason.

In fact, just last night Andy called and told me he’d taken him all day (which he does often, whenever he can, because Andy moved just 5 minutes away just to be close to his son)… and that Jonah was “squirrely” — he’d had an aggression just that morning because another kid came in his room and Jonah didn’t want him there.

Jonah ended up attacking a caregiver and pulling some of her hair out.  Now, that’s not a “two-person take-down” – the stuff I’ve been speaking of that has been mitigated to once a month or so — but it is aggression and he still needs to work on that.

I am still afraid to be alone with my son, Andy suggested I add once he read this.  I don’t like to type it but it is true.  Jonah cycles through his behaviors (what I’ve called the pendulum) and at any time he could really hurt someone during an aggression.

Andy also suggested I not answer flamers, so I took a lot of other stuff out.

‘Nuff said.

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